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Friday, February 29, 2008

What are Fused Sentences?

A fused sentence, also known as a run-on, occurs when you join two sentences without any punctuation or conjunction. To separate sentences, you can use a period. To join sentences, you can use a semicolon (;) alone between the two sentences, or you can use a semicolon and an adverbial conjunction followed by a comma. Another way to join the two sentences is to place a comma and a coordinating conjunction between the sentences.

Coordinating Conjunctions-- for, or, nor, yet, but, and, so
Adverbial Conjunctions-- therefore, furthermore, however, in addition, first, then, consequently

The Miami Heat basketball team has lost more than 10 games in a row many fans refuse to go to the home games. = fused sentence

The Miami Heat basketball team has lost more than 10 games in a row. Many fans refuse to go to the home games. = two simple sentences

The Miami Heat basketball team has lost more than 10 games in a row; many fans refuse to go the the home games. = a compound sentence

The Miami Heat basketball team has lost more than 10 games in a row; therefore, many fans refuse to go the home games. = a compound sentence

The Miami Heat basketball team has lost more then 10 games in a row, so many fans refuse to go to the home games. = a compound sentence



2 comments:

  1. Nice information. Fused sentence sound weird to me. It could be very confusing sometimes. I think usually we use simple sentence especially in technical writing.

    ReplyDelete
  2. I have a feeling that you would have a hay day with my grammar.

    ReplyDelete

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